Food for thought: working at McDonald's

Another gem from Girls. Hannah has basically been fired from her unpaid internship because the won't pay her and her parents have stopped supporting her. So she is discussing her situation with some friends.

Hannah: So I calculated, and I can last in New York for three and a half more days. Maybe seven if I don't eat lunch.

Jessa: I'm going to find you a job worthy of your talents.

Hannah: Well I appreciate that, but I don't know how you're going to find a job fast enough. I'm going to have to work at like, McDonald's.

Marnie: You're not gonna work at McDonald's.

Jay: What's wrong with McDonald's? You should work at McDonald's. It's great. Fucking incredible. You know how many people McDonald's feeds every day? You know how many people it employs around the world? Plus, they make an incredible product, okay? It tastes tremendous, it's affordable, it's fuckin' consistant. I can walk into a McDonald's in Nigeria, order chicken McNuggets, when I bite into them, you know what it's gonna taste like? It's gonna taste like home.

Hannah: Doesn't mean I have to work there. I went to college.

Jay: Yeah, I went to college too, you know where it left me? I have fifty thousand dollars in student loans, that's how deep in debt I am. I'm sorry, but watching this, this is like watching Clueless. 

 

 

"Well, when you get hungry enough, you're gonna figure it out"

The pilot episode of Girls speaks volumes about the lives of twenty-somethings who just haven't quite got everything in order just yet, and please give us some time, thank you very much. Case in point, the scene in the office of Hannah's (Lena Dunham's) unpaid internship at a publishing company, where she must ask for payment now that her parents have cut off their support of her, two years after she's finished college. Scene:

Boss: Hannah.

Hannah: Hello, Alister.

[Silence as he goes back to his work]

Hannah again: Hello.

Boss: You seem eager.

Hannah: As you know, I have been working here for over a year.

Boss: Has it been that long? Well, you are an invaluable part of our operation.

Hannah: Which, I recently learned, means very valuable, as opposed to not at all valuable. And I wanted to let you know that my circumstances have changed, and I can no longer afford to work for free.

Boss: Oh Hannah, I'm so sorry to lose you. I was just going to start you manning our Twitter--you have just the quippy voice for that.

Hannah: Oh, no no, I'm not quitting, I just um, I know that Joy Lin got hired after interning, so I thought that maybe--

Boss: Hannah, Joy Lin knows Photoshop. Now, in this economy, do you know how many internship requests I get everyday?

Hannah: I would assume, a lot.

Boss: Fifty. It's about fifty. I practically route them into my spam folder, so if you think you have just nothing left to learn from us--

Hannah: No, it is not that. Really. I just, you know, gotta eat.

Boss: Well... when you get hungry enough, you're gonna figure it out.

Hannah: Do you mean like physically hungry or like hungry for the job?

Boss: [with enthusiasm] I am really gonna miss your energy. I think this is going to be really good for you.

[He hugs her.]

Hannah: Uh, you mentioned that when I was finished with my book I could send it to you?

Boss: Uh, well, we wouldn't have you here to read it for us, would we?

TV Show: on urban white girls in 2012

Last night I finally began watching a show I'd been reading about, and to be quite honest, sounded just like something made for me, whose characters I might love. Girls, on HBO, which premiered in April.

I love the characters. They are confused, they have both aim and absolutely no aim, they are figuring out men, career, life. I was crying laughing as we breezed through the first three episodes. Lena Dunham, creator, writer, and one of the stars of the show, is a 25-year-old, and she has captured perfectly many of the topics and issues of exactly this--my--generation. Out of college, mediocre economy and job market, living in the city... and from there, the story grows. The hilarious discourse on exactly life right now hit so many touchstones for me.

Hannah makes a ton of bad decisions, but man, how I love her already. She unabashedly tells her parents she thinks she is "the voice of her generation," and asks them to keep giving her money so that she can determinedly finish her memoir. "Or at least a voice of a generation," she adds. She also eats a cupcake in the bathtub (which I have been known to do), has the most spectacular tattoos, is perfectly not skinny, and has existential freak-outs about HIV/AIDS that are absolutely ridiculous and hilarious.

Today Lena Dunham talked about the show, and its discourse on twenty-somethings and all the mess of life, with Terry Gross on Fresh Air.

Terry Gross on why Girls has been striking a nerve with many:

I think women in particular are so hungry for a series or a movie, or movies, about young women who are kind of feminist--whether they describe themselves that way or not--and aren't just all about clothes and engagement rings, and who are trying to  really figure out who they are where they fit in in the world.

Full disclosure -- this is an HBO show. Be prepared for the sex scenes. A la Games of Thrones...