Create in NYC, or: fabric that I love and other things

I got to visit Mood Fabrics on our visit to New York City, and it was overwhelming. (Really; I couldn't think of one project I'd even want to attempt with so many fabrics). Then we happened upon Purl Soho in the very last hours of our last day there, on the walk back to the hotel via a new route. In between, we also made it into a few great shops with quirky bits that I loved. Certainly this is a great city in which to seek and find creative inspiration.

Mannequins dressed in home dec fabrics adorn the windows of Mood Fabrics.

For all your mohair needs... they have every kind of material imaginable.

Stacks and stacks of leather, arranged by color and texture. Amazing.

I really love this fabric. I was struck with the immediate desire to buy a dozen yards ($25/yd) to bring home and slip cover my sofa. This is subtle enough but also bold enough to be an amazing living room statement. It's also very me.

The edge of the store... urban chic.

Swooning over midcentury lines and amazing textiles in a Henry Miller pop-up store in Soho. Can I have this?

I desperately want to make wool stuffed pigeons. So adorable! (At Henry Miller pop-up store)

I also adore these wooden people, each with his or her own quirks. But they were over $100 each; this picture was free.

I cannot remember the name of this clothing store, but every wall was lined in old sewing machines. I <3 industrial chic.

Wait, what the what?! It's Purl Soho! I must peek inside!

Yes...

Oh yes...

These quilts and hangings are some of the projects featured on the Purl Bee blog, in the flesh.

As are these delectable little fruit slices made of high-quality felt and hand-stitched. They are coasters.

Do you SEE how many Kona solids they have on that back wall? That's me in heaven. Heaven. I bought two shades of Kona for a [secret] project I am working on this fall. I also bought a ridiculous half-yard of oil cloth, purely because it was amazing and because oilcloth is so hard to find in anything other than picnic-table check.

So, so many things to file away in the inspiration file. Along with the whole entire city of New York.

I'll finish off Sunday night watching the season finale of Girls. Another NYC homage.

Graphic New York City

So there are an endless number of ways to be inspired in--and by--New York City, and I am only adding myself to the category of people who fell in love with the city upon visiting. It certainly makes itself easy to love, if you would rather not have to use a car, enjoy eating pizza on a sidewalk patio at midnight, and want to randomly discover art galleries, quirky stores, and delicious street food piled one after the next on every little street. One of the ways the city inspired me was in its graphic, natural state; that is, the billboards and architecture combining with graffiti, tiles, manhole covers, stairwells, creating an bold urban patchwork of colors, patterns, movement. Here are a few of my favorite examples.

 

I love: Triangles

I have been obsessing over the triangles and colors in this quilt, by Blue is Bleu, for several days now, since it came up on my Pinterest feed. I've sketched it several times, poorly as I am wont to do, because I just can't get it out of my head. Triangles and their bold geometry have been on the back-burner of my creative juices for awhile. Back in September, I impulsively bought a bunch of fabric for a menswear quilt (different project) and added on a flying geese triangle plastic template, which I have yet to use at all. To be quite honest, they look stunning, but I know how sneakily tricky triangles can be in quilts-- all those points to match and perfect. And while I embrace wonky shapes and modern aesthetic, I still don't want to end up with a quilt made of triangles that, well, suck.

So I'll keep this image in my brain for the day when I'm ready to tackle triangles. I adore everything Audrie has done: the all-solids, the rich splashes of tangerine and gold and red, the quilting lines--simple and geometric--the binding (that black and white punch!), and the shapes themselves.